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Wild Oat

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A frequently found ancestor of cultivated oat crops.


 

 

Wild Oat: sewing but not reaping

Post date: Sunday, 22 November, 2015 - 00:00

It is easy to forget that our modern cereal crops were developed from wild varieties of common grasses. It is when one finds a grass and then identifies it as wild oat (Avena fatua) that this is brought home. Even though the family resemblance is there the wild and the cultivated oat differ in many ways and although related it does not take much wild oat to grow amongst cereal crops to cause problems in harvesting.

Wild oat has very delicate spikelets on fine stemmed branches, several (five or six) emanating from hubs at intervals along the central stem. The spikelets are covered in fine, silky hairs. The sheath-like leaf comes at the bottom of the stem. Flowering from June until September it can be found quite frequently in the corner of arable fields and on waste ground.


 

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Common Name Wild Oat
Scientific Name Avena fatua
Interest Level
1
Species Family Grasses
Preferred Environment
Look for
Additional Identification Notes
Similar Species

This species is often found in these habitats:

Habitat(s) Relationship
BF: Fringes - roadsides, bare ground & wasteland Associated
BA: Arable farmland Associated