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Treble-bar

Photograph by: 
Peter Orchard

Easily disturbed and you may catch a glimpse of it by day if you are walking on shrubby downland or sparse woodland in May and June.


 

  • Aplocera plagiata: the treble-bar moth

    Post date: Friday, 17 February, 2017 - 21:17

    The treble-bar moth (Aplocera plagiata) has three bars across its forewings! For once, a common name that reflects the creature it is attached to! But please do not be fooled, there are other moths with three bars across their wings ...

    The treble-bar is a night flier but it is easily disturbed and you may catch a glimpse of it by day if you are walking on shrubby downland or sparse woodland in May and June, possibly also in August and September if there is a second brood. It is not uncommon but not one of the more regular day time moths you might encounter. 

    The larvae are primarily associated with flowers of the St Johnswort family.


     

Common Name Treble-bar
Scientific Name Aplocera plagiata
Species Group Moths 085 387 Geometerids
Status
Interest Level
2
Visabile
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Identification Notes
Primary Habitat
Preferred Environment
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Additional Identification Notes
Similar Species

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Notebook Distribution Map Sites List Some Charts Some Photographs Recent Records Guidance Notes

To see related species click here: 

Moths 085 387 Geometerids