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Harts-tongue

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Common on damp banks and shady places.


 
 

This is a common plant in the south west of England and especially so in many places in Dorset. The hart's-tongue fern (Phyllitis scolopendrium) can be abundant where the environment is suitable. 
It can be food in woods, especially woodland on hill sides, hedgerows, among rocks, on walls, on the sides of ditches, even inside water wells. In short, it likes warm, darkish, damp places. 

The classic ferns have rather complex leaves but hart's-tongue has a smooth, shiny, undivided leaf in this familiar 'deer's tongue' shape which is so unique and enables it to be easily identified.  

Hart's-tongue is, in fact, a 'spleenwort' which are a sub-family of the fern group. The spores are released from little brown 'pockets' that form on the back of the leaf. The Hart's-tongue is in leaf all year round but produces new ones each spring.


 

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Common Name Harts-tongue
Scientific Name Phyllitis scolopendrium
Interest Level
1/5
Related Species - CLICK TO VIEW Spleenworts
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This species is often found in these habitats:

Habitat(s) Relationship
W1: Broad-leaf Woodland Associated
SM: Mixed Scrub Associated