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Bucks-horn Plantain


Common plant found on grassy, sandy and rocky areas close to the sea.


 

  • Bucks-horn Plantain: its in the bag

    Post date: Tuesday, 9 August, 2016 - 21:30

    I suppose some plants are just boring! No nice flowers, no impressive foliage, nothing. Well, to my mind, plantains fall into the boring category and are not much to look at. Indeed, it would be easy to think that they are not actually flowers at all. 

    The buck's-horn plantain (Plantago coronopus) is very much a part of typical seaside vegetation and is common near our coasts on grassy areas, sandy and rocky, close to the sea. Although not much to look at it is quite distinctive with the 'flower' heads on stems that come out from the centre base of the plant in a curve upwards to form a sort of crown (coronpus?). It is the leaves of the plant that give rise to 'buck's horn' as they are the shape of deer antlers.

    It may not be much to look at but it is grown commercially as a vegetable called minutina or erba stella and it is sometimes included in bags of salad mix sold in supermarkets as the leaves have a sweet, nutty flavour.  


     

Common Name Bucks-horn Plantain
Scientific Name Plantago coronopus
Species Group Plantain Family Plantaginaceae
Status
Interest Level
3
Visabile
Look for
Identification Notes
Primary Habitat
Family Plantain family - Plantaginaceae
Status Occasional
Flower Colour Group Green
Visible
  • 05 - May
  • 06 - June
  • 07 - July
Preferred Environment
Look for Curved stems with green flower spikes by the sea
Additional Identification Notes
Similar Species

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Notebook Distribution Map Sites List Some Charts Some Photographs Recent Records Guidance Notes

To see related species click here: 

Plantain Family Plantaginaceae