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Antler Moth

Photograph by: 
Peter Orchard

Can be seen by day on warm days in August visiting the flowers of thistles, ragwort and other members of the daisy family. 


 

  • Antler Moth: what is the point

    Post date: Friday, 1 April, 2016 - 00:00

    The antler moth (Cerapteryx graminis) is species that can be seen by day, especially in the (sometimes!) warm weather of August when it visits the flowers of thistles, ragwort and other members of the daisy family. It is also active by night as well and can be found by using a moth light trap or by pasting sugary substances on tree trunks!

    The antler moth likes open country and where it occurs it can be common in mid-summer although it does appear to be declining in frequency and numbers in the south of England. The obsession with ragwort pulling and spraying thistles has undoubtedly taken its toll on this species but as we seem to be becoming a bit more relaxed about ragwort and thistles these days its numbers may well recover in time.

    Sadly, my photograph does not really show the pointed and branched cream coloured markings on the wing from which its name is derived. 


     

Common Name Antler Moth
Scientific Name Cerapteryx graminis
Species Group Moths 516 899 Noctuidae
Status
Interest Level
3
Visabile
Look for
Identification Notes
Primary Habitat
Preferred Environment
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Additional Identification Notes
Similar Species

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Notebook Distribution Map Sites List Some Charts Some Photographs Recent Records Guidance Notes

To see related species click here: 

Moths 516 899 Noctuidae