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Species Photograph Gallery

Alder

The alder can grow into quite a big tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Alder

It has catkins that are larger than hazel

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Alder

Although a deciduous tree it has seed heads like fir cones

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Alder

The leaves are broad, ribbed and serated

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Alder

The flowers have a purple tinge

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The bunches of keys can stay on the tree for much of the winter

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The bark is fairly smooth and ash coloured

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The key-like seeds have a single 'wing'

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The inside does not really show aging circles

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The flowers appear in small sprays and are dark brown, almost black

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The buds appear at the end of twigs and are chocolate brown

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The bark develops wrinkles with age!

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

In winter the twigs bear large black opposite buds

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Ash

The ash is a tall, elegant tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

The flowers are not particularly conspicuous  

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

A big, strong tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

Newly developing nuts

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

Bark much smoother than the oak

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

Fallen nuts are known as beech mast

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

Leaves can often stay on the tree all winter

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Beech

The leaf buds are very pronounced

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Black Poplar

Black poplar produces these attractive purple catkins

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Black Poplar

The branches have multiple twigs at the ends

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Black Poplar

The bark has vertical ridges

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Black Poplar

This is a big, tall and bold tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

The tree has masses of thin branches and has a greenish tinge in winter 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

The bark is rough and attractive to lichens

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

The twigs are very brittle which is where it gets its name

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

The wood is very light in colour

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

The buds are alternate along the twig

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Crack Willow

the flower buds are silvery and furry

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Creeping Willow

The flowers emerge alternate rather than opposite

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Creeping Willow

A low growing creeping shrub

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Downy Birch

Very similar to silver birch but more upright

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Downy Birch

The bark is usually smoother than silver birch and more coppery in colour in young trees

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Downy Birch

The leaf buds are alternate up the stem

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Downy Birch

Like other birch family members it produces catkins in spring

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Downy Birch

As the tree ages the bark becomes more silvery and is easily confused with silver birch but the bark is always smoother than that of its cousin. 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

English Elm

The leaf is really all there is to identify this once elegant tree as it rarely grows above head height before succumbing to Dutch elm disease 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Goat Willow

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Goat Willow

The flowers of the willow family are similar across most species

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Goat Willow

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Goat Willow

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Goat Willow

Goat willow (or sallow) is not a large tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Poplar

The bark gives the tree its grey colouring

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Poplar

The buds on the twigs are alternate

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Poplar

Fully grown grey poplars can be quite tall and elegant

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Poplar

Flowers are small catkins

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Willow

The bark has a greyish look and is often pitted

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Willow

Close up it is easy to see how the twigs get their silvery-grey appearance

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Willow

The branch tips are distinctly silvery-grey which gives it its name

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Willow

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Grey Willow

The grey willow is usually foud in damp, marshy habitats

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

Less often seen are the female flowers that receive the pollen

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

The female flowers produce the hazel nuts in the autumn

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

When a central trunk is present the bark is quite shiny

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

The hazel is not a big tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

The leaf edge is finely serrated and comes to a point

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

When coppiced all that is left is the central stool

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

They are often coppiced and so present unnatural shape

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hazel

 

The catkin is the male flower that produces pollen

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

Holm oak produces acorns like other oaks

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

The flowers are quite insignificant ans easily overlooked

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

Unlike other oaks it is evergreen and has pointed, waxy leaves

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

The underside of the leaf is silvery grey

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

Unlike the deciduous oaks it has a fairly smooth bark

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Holm Oak

Holm oak can grow to be quite a large tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Horse-chestnut

Horse-chestnut produces these lovely white flower spikes

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Horse-chestnut

The flowers can also be pink

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Horse-chestnut

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Horse-chestnut

The twigs are rather 'nobly'!

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Horse-chestnut

The horse-chestnut is a large, spreading tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hybrid Black Poplar

Tall, slender trees often planted in rows as shelter

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hybrid Black Poplar

The bark is crusty rather than rough

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Hybrid Black Poplar

The tree produces wispy catkins 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The profile clearly shows the ageing rings

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The lobed oak leaf must surely be one of the most familiar to everyone 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The leaf buds tend to be in a cluster at the end of the twigs

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The ends of the branches are very twiggy!

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

Our beautiful oak in summer

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

In winter the masses of branches and twigs becomes apparent

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The flowers are lovely green tassels

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

he pedunculate oak produces acorns on stalks or pendules

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

he acorns turn brown before falling

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The bark is rough and ridged

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Pedunculate Oak

The bark often has these shiny overlapping plates!

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Rowan

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Rowan

The rowan produces wonderful white bunches of flowers

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Rowan

The flowers turn to bright red berries in late summer

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

The silver birch is a pretty tree, especially when the leaves have just emerged

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

In winter the silver bark really stands out

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

The twigs are slender and show the early development of the catkins

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

The catkins are the male flowers and open in April

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

As the tree ages so the bark becomes pitted and cracked

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

The leaves are small, shiny and deep green 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Silver Birch

The leaves are small, shiny and deep green 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sweet Chestnut

the bark is ridged

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sweet Chestnut

The flowers are long and thin

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sweet Chestnut

The chestnuts are contained in prickly cases

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sweet Chestnut

The nuts readily fall to the ground when ripe

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sweet Chestnut

The leaves are narrow and ribbed

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sycamore

The leaves are large with five points

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sycamore

The seeds are double winged and turn brown before being blown along in the wind

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Sycamore

The flowers fall downwards whereas the similar Norway maple has flower that are erect 

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Walnut

The leaves are pointed and shiny

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Whitebeam

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Whitebeam

The leaves are white on the underside which gives the tree its appearance

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Whitebeam

Another tree that produces red berries

Photograph by: Richard Bradford

Whitebeam

Photograph by: Richard Bradford

Wild Service-tree

The leaves have multiple points

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Wild Service-tree

It is not a large tree

Photograph by: Peter Orchard

Wych Elm

The fruits have curious wings on them

Photograph by: Peter Orchard