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Tree Identification Aid

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To aid users of mobile devices as well as those with a mouse or laptop finger pad this site uses a simple image-based menu system. Virtually every picture you see (images and photos) are links to more information arranged in a sort of top-down structure. See an image, click or tap on it to open a new page.

Displaying 49 - 96 of 169

The grid below contains my photographs of various aspects of common trees. If you are looking to identify a tree from a characteristic you have noted (the leaf or flower for example) then use the 'photograph set' filter to select all the photographs of that characteristic and see if you can find a good match! If you think you know what the tree is then you can select a species from the 'tree index' and see all my photos for that species. Click any of the thumbnails displayed to see the big picture.

Profile - Winter
Very similar to silver birch but more upright
Bark
The bark is usually smoother than silver birch and more coppery in colour
Leaf buds
The leaf buds are alternate up the stem
Flower
The masses of smaller flowers make the flat topped elderflower
Flower
In late May the tree has lots of flat-topped cream flowers
Seed or fruit
In autumn the flowers turn to clusters of fruity berries
Flower
A close-up of the flower
Bark
The bark of older trees is very wrinkled
Bark
Young trees have a dusky coloured smooth bark with some notches on them
Leaf
Diue to Dutch elm disease the elms rarely grow more than head height
Leaf
The lead is really all there is to indentify this once elegant tree
Leaf
The leaf is a small version of the classic Canadian maple shape
Flower
The flowers of the willow family are similar across most species
Flower
When the flowers first emerge they are silvery and often called pussy willow
Bark
The trunk is not that hefty and often covered in lichen
Profile - Winter
Goat willow is not a large tree
Profile - Winter
Fully grown grey poplars can be quite tall and elegant
Profile - Winter
Early in life they can be a bit scrubby!
Bark
The bark gives the tree its grey colouring
Twig
The buds on the twigs are alternate
Profile - Winter
The grey willow is usually foud in damp, marshy habitats
Profile - Winter
It is generally shrubby but can grow into a large tree
Other
The branch tips are distinctly silvery-grey which gives it its name
Other
Close up it is easy to see how the twigs get their silvery-grey appearance
Leaf buds
The leaf buds are arranged alternately spirally up the stem
Bark
The bark has a greyish look and is often pitted
Flower
The flower will remind gardeners of lacecap hydrangaes
Flower
The outside petals surround others that appear to be buds that never open
Leaf
The shape of the leaf is useful once the the distinctive flowers are over
Seed or fruit
The red berries in autumn are poisonous
Flower
The flower is a conspicuous addition to the hedgerow in May
Flower
The flowers form large white clusrers
Seed or fruit
The flowers turn in to the haws we recognise in the late summer
Seed or fruit
The hedgerow is often red with the plentiful haws
Flower
The catkin is the male flower that produces pollen
Flower
Less often seen are the female flowers that receive the pollen
Seed or fruit
The female flowers produce the hazel nuts in the autumn
Profile - Winter
The hazel is not a big tree
Profile - Winter
They are often coppiced and so present unnatural shape
Cross section
When coppiced all that is left is the central stool
Profile - Winter
New growth shhots from the stool and is ready for coppicing again after about seven years
Bark
When a central trunk is present the bark is quite shiny
Leaf
The leaf edge is finely serrated and comes to a point
Leaf
The holly is best known for its prickly leaf
Flower
The flower is inconspicuous and often overlooked
Seed or fruit
But no one can overlook the bright red berries!
Leaf
The leaves are pointed and have smooth edges unlike other oaks
Profile - Winter, Profile - Summer
Holm oak can grow to be quite a large tree

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