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Euclidia glyphica: the burnet companion

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Euclidia glyphica: the burnet companion

The burnet companion (Euclidia glyphica) is one of those moths that defy the popular belief that butterflies fly by day and moths by night; it adores the sunshine of May and June (if there is any!). It is easily mistaken for a butterfly, especially something like the dingy skipper, but they display clear orange patches on the under-wings, especially in flight but also, sometimes, at rest.

This is quite a common species on downland in southern England and Dorset is a good place to see them. They also inhabit open woodland rides and clearings as well as railway cuttings, even damp meadows but downland is by far the best place for them.

I would like to know how it gets its name but I have yet to find out. It does favour the same habitat as other day flying moths, the five and six spot burnets, and so it may this, they are the burnet moths companions.


 

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This is just my nature note: for lots more information including distribution maps, status charts, identification guidance and more photographs go to the species home page by clicking/tapping the icon